Ginger-Citrus Tea

Ginger tea has warming and stimulating properties and is especially good during the cold winter months. Ginger has many health properties, most commonly known to help with nausea and support digestion. Avoid ginger tea at bedtime if you are sensitive, since it is stimulating and may interfere with sleep.

Ginger Citrus Tea
Ginger-Citrus Tea
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This tea is warming on cold winter night and will help you through the cold & flu season should you get sick. Ginger tea does not have to be drunk warm or hot, it can also be drunk at room temperature to benefit from its warming properties. Ginger tea is also excellent to support digestion and to sooth tummy aches.
Servings Prep Time
2 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 20 minutes
Ginger Citrus Tea
Ginger-Citrus Tea
Print Recipe
This tea is warming on cold winter night and will help you through the cold & flu season should you get sick. Ginger tea does not have to be drunk warm or hot, it can also be drunk at room temperature to benefit from its warming properties. Ginger tea is also excellent to support digestion and to sooth tummy aches.
Servings Prep Time
2 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 20 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Peel ginger with a spoon, I like using a grapefruit spoon for this purpose. Removing the peel will remove any bitter taste that can come from the peel. Slice the ginger in to thin slices.
  2. Place the ginger slices in a pot and add filtered water. Bring to a boil and let simmer with lid on partially for 10-20 minutes. The longer time will make a stronger tea. To make the tea even stronger add more time or ginger, if the tea is too spicy add more water, adjust according to your taste.
  3. Remove from stove and pour through a sieve in to a cup. Add your favourite citrus (lemon, lime or orange) to taste.
Recipe Notes

Get more recipes and resources on how to live an anti-inflammatory lifestyle.
www.TrulyU.com | Annika Ek RHN, CH, NNCP - Functional Nutritionist | Regain Your Glow(TM).

(c) Copyright 2017 - All Rights Reserved Annika Ek International Inc.

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Bone Broth in Instant Pot

The Instant Pot has revolutionized the way I cook due to it's ability to cook whole food meals that would normally involve more planning and prepping in an hour or less. It is perfect for everyday cooking when you need to get dinner on the table quickly, or as you will see below allow you to make nutritious bone broth in 2 hours vs. 24 hours in a slow cooker. Learn more about the instant pot.

Bone broth has gone from a quiet corner stone in many traditional diets, to an integral part of Paleo inspired and healing diets. As bone broth simmers in a slightly acidic liquid (the acidity comes from the addition of apple cider vinegar) collagen is released from the bones. Collagen contains the amino acids glycine and proline, two important nutrients that promotes healthy growth of bones, tendons, ligaments, skin, hair and nails. Collagen is also healing to the gut and nourishing in general.

InstantPotBoneBroth
Bone Broth in the Instant Pot
Print Recipe
I always try to have a few jars of bone broth in my fridge or freezer so I can quickly make a soup or stew. I also love drinking bone broth as is or spun in a high speed blender like a Vitamix, with a fat (I often use duck fat) for a “latte” style broth.
Servings Prep Time
8-12 cups 10 minutes
Passive Time
2 hours plus cool down time in the instant pot
Servings Prep Time
8-12 cups 10 minutes
Passive Time
2 hours plus cool down time in the instant pot
InstantPotBoneBroth
Bone Broth in the Instant Pot
Print Recipe
I always try to have a few jars of bone broth in my fridge or freezer so I can quickly make a soup or stew. I also love drinking bone broth as is or spun in a high speed blender like a Vitamix, with a fat (I often use duck fat) for a “latte” style broth.
Servings Prep Time
8-12 cups 10 minutes
Passive Time
2 hours plus cool down time in the instant pot
Servings Prep Time
8-12 cups 10 minutes
Passive Time
2 hours plus cool down time in the instant pot
Ingredients
Optional
Servings: cups
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredient in instant pot and cover with filtered water. Do not fill more than 2/3 full.
    InstantPotBoneBroth
  2. Cook on high pressure in instant pot for 2 hours, let pressure come down naturally. Set time using the "Manual" button.
  3. Place a wide mouth funnel in a 1 qt canning jar and a fine mesh strainer inside the funnel. Ladle broth from the instant pot in to the jar, leaving an inch at top if freezing. Allow to cool then place lids.
    Straining bone broth
  4. Store in fridge for 3-4 days or freeze.
  5. Add sea salt to taste at time of use.
Recipe Notes

Get more recipes and resources on how to live an anti-inflammatory lifestyle.
www.TrulyU.com | Annika Ek RHN, CH, NNCP - Functional Nutritionist | Regain Your Glow(TM).

(c) Copyright 2017 - All Rights Reserved Annika Ek International Inc.

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Cooking Leafy Greens

Cooking greens
Cooking leafy greens, or cooking down dark leafy greens, is something I do almost every day. The “down” refers to down in size, as the greens compact significantly during cooking. This is such a quick and easy way to eat a large amount of greens with ease.

Cooked greens is a corner stone of a healthy diet and delivers valuable nutrients such as magnesium, manganese, potassium, calcium and folate.

The dark leafy greens in this recipe are kale and swiss chard, but you can also use collard greens, bok choy, spinach etc. Just remember to start with the sturdier greens like kale, then add “lighter” greens like swiss chard and spinach towards the end to avoid overcooking. As you get used to cooking different leafy greens you will learn how long they need in the pan by paying attention to the texture and flavour you like the best. Have fun with this recipe, let it evolve and use what you have.

If you have leftovers, have them at your next meal (including breakfast) cold or warmed up. On my plate cooked greens go with anything!

 

cooking leafy greens
Cooking Down Dark Leafy Greens
Print Recipe
The dark leafy greens in this recipe are kale and swiss chard, but you can also use collard greens, bok choy, spinach etc. Just remember to start with the sturdier greens like kale, then add "lighter" greens like swiss chard and spinach towards the end to avoid over cooking. As you get used to cooking different leafy greens you will learn how long they need in the pan by paying attention to the texture and flavour you like the best. Have fun with this recipe, let it evolve and use what you have!
Servings Prep Time
4 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
cooking leafy greens
Cooking Down Dark Leafy Greens
Print Recipe
The dark leafy greens in this recipe are kale and swiss chard, but you can also use collard greens, bok choy, spinach etc. Just remember to start with the sturdier greens like kale, then add "lighter" greens like swiss chard and spinach towards the end to avoid over cooking. As you get used to cooking different leafy greens you will learn how long they need in the pan by paying attention to the texture and flavour you like the best. Have fun with this recipe, let it evolve and use what you have!
Servings Prep Time
4 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. To wash your greens you can rinse them under running water or place them all in a sink filled with cold water. Shake off excess water and place in colander, dish rack or on a tea towel.
  2. Mince garlic clove and put aside.
  3. One leaf at a time, trim off the end of the stem, then fold leaf in half, top sides together, with a sharp knife cut away middle stem and put aside. Slice the leaf down the middle, then in to strips. Put in a bowl or in a pile on the cutting board, move on to the next leaf until all leaves are done. Keep each type of leafy green in separate bowl or piles since cooking time will vary.
  4. Heat a 10 - 12" cast iron pan on medium heat and add coconut oil, once melted add the "sturdiest" of the greens, in this recipe that is the kale. Don't worry if it appears to be too much for your pan, as soon as they start to cook down they will reduce in size. Lower the heat and continue to toss the greens to coat with oil. After 2-3 minutes add swiss chard and keep tossing to coat. As the greens cook down the pan may get dry, add 1-2 tbsp of water as needed.
  5. When all greens have reduced and are soft, stir in garlic and sprinkle with salt and a few turns of freshly ground pepper. Cook for one more minute then sprinkle with fresh herbs and serve.
  6. If you have leftovers, have them at your next meal (including breakfast) cold or warmed up. On my plate cooked greens go with anything. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

Get more recipes from www.TrulyU.com | Annika Ek Functional Nutritionist | Regain Your Glow.

(c) Copyright 2016 - All Rights Reserved Annika Ek International Inc.

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Cold Water – Is It Bad For You?

At first glance it may seem irrelevant whether you have cold water or room temperature water in your glass, you are drinking water after all!

Becoming aware of how the temperature of the water you drink impacts your digestion, and health in general, is a simple way to add a healthy habit to your day. This is especially important if you in any way struggle with a health condition, or fatigue in general, when every little thing you do counts.

How Cold Water Disrupts Digestion

  1. THROAT & VOICE - Do you reach for cold water when you have a sore throat? Didn't think so. Drinking water at room temperature, or if your throat is sore or will speak all day or sing in a performance you likely go for warm (but not hot) water. Compared to cold water, room temperature, or warm water supports digestion and is relaxing and soothing for the throat and vocal cords along the way down to the stomach. Take a tip from singers who sip their warm water all day long for strong vocal chops.
  2. ​TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE - There is a great difference between body temperature and the temperature of cold water. Energy is needed to bring the water temperature up reach body temperature, energy that can be put to better use elsewhere. Who doesn't need more energy?
  3. COLD IS CONTRACTING - As cold water travels through the digestive tract it may contract muscles and lead to tension and impaired function. The opposite is true for water that is closer to body temperature as it gently "moves things along", keeping the digestive tract relaxed and well hydrated so it can do it's job of digestion, absorption and flushing out toxins. In fact, constipation may be helped by avoiding all cold drinks.
  4. DIGESTIVE FIRE - Another angle to help you see why drinking cold water may not be beneficial to your digestion, is to think of your digestion as a fire. This digestive fire "burns" your food and transforms your chicken dinner in to single amino acids that are absorbed in to your blood stream and delivered to your cells, where they are put to good use. This process of going from chicken dinner to single amino acid is complex, involves many steps and requires a great deal of energy. So why would you want to make it harder for your body to get the nutrients it needs by literally throwing cold water on your digestive fire?
  5. YES BUT... - Sure, when you're young, healthy and brimming with energy you're likely to get away with cold drinks. But as we age and the digestive fire weakens (think 40+), or if you have troubled digestion to start with, a chronic illness, or are otherwise weakened, room temperature, or warm water, will be your ally.

To sum it up, by avoiding cold water (or cold drinks in general) you are supporting your digestion and absorption of nutrients. You are also helping your intestines stay relaxed and keep things moving for easy and consistent elimination.

Kermit Pancakes

These plantain based pancakes with baby spinach are bright green, hence I gave them the name “Kermit Pancakes”. For me these pancakes were are big part of being able to stick to the AIP (Autoimmune Paleo) diet, especially at the beginning. Make a batch and enjoy them fresh, that’s when they are the best, but they also store well in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days. The pancakes can also be frozen and reheated in the toaster oven.

Kermit Pancakes
Kermit Pancakes
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10
Cook Time
12
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10
Cook Time
12
Kermit Pancakes
Kermit Pancakes
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10
Cook Time
12
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10
Cook Time
12
Ingredients
Dry
Wet
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Set oven to 400 F convection (425 F if no convection). Arrange 2 racks to in the middle of the oven if using convection oven, otherwise 1 rack in the middle. Place unbleached parchment paper or silicone baking mats on 2 oven trays.
  2. Rinse plantains and cut off ends, then slice in half and score each half lengthwise. Using your hands, peel the plantains, slice lengthwise and dice. Place in high speed blender.
  3. Melt coconut oil in a small sauce pan on the stove. Use 3 tbsp for recipe, use 2 tbsp (1 tbsp for each tray) to brush on top of parchment paper or silicone mats. Brushing with oil will give the pancakes a nice golden surface.
  4. Add the following ingredients to the blender: water, arrow root, coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt, melted coconut oil and apple cider vinegar.
  5. Finally add 3 handfuls of baby spinach. Blend in high speed blender, gradually bringing it to full speed. If using a Vitamix, use the tamper to get all ingredients incorporated. Blend until smooth, do not over blend.
    Blending kermit pancakes
  6. Use a 1/4 cup measurement to scoop pancakes on to prepared baking trays. You may fill 2 trays, or be a few pancakes short, how much batter you get depends on the size of your plantains. Bake in the middle of the oven for approx. 6 minutes until pancakes are holding together so they can be flipped and are slightly golden. Bake for another 3-4 minutes. Times may vary depending on your oven, check oven often when first making this recipe.
    Baking Kermit pancakes
  7. Kermit pancakes are best right out of the oven! I like these pancakes with blueberries, I thaw frozen wild blueberries and they are a juicy accompaniment.
    Kermit Pancakes
Recipe Notes

TIP! Choosing plantains - how ripe your plaintains are will make a difference in how liquid your batter will be. Look for plantains that are more green/yellow for a thicker batter, but that is not always available. If your plantains are on the riper side you may need another tbsp. of coconut flour to thicken the batter.

See Annika Recommends for resources.

For more recipes and other free resources on how to live an anti-inflammatory lifestyle visit TrulyU.com.

Copyright 2016 All rights reserved.

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